Friday, April 9, 2010

Literally Ironic

So I get home from the Lift, where I taught on the Bible (what it's for, why it's important, what the main story is, etc). I also talked quite a bit about why I don't like the word "literally" especially as it relates to the Bible: the word's so misused and misunderstood that it doesn't help us be clear in what we're saying. I don't believe that Jesus was a literal person, I think he was a historical person... he actually existed in history, not just literature. Nobody says that Abe Lincoln was "literally" President.

AAAANYWAY. I got home and checked my Reader, and what do I see? Perfect synchronicity!

NOTE: This doesn't display well in blogger. Click the picture to see the whole thing. Or subscribe in Google Reader or something.



http://xkcd.com/725/

If you've not browsed the entire archives of the brilliant webcomic XKCD, you should go do that right now. Or maybe just watch this a few times and hum it for the next four days. Whatever. I'm not here to judge.

Incidentally, if you want to hear the rest of my crusade against the word "literal" you're welcome to give it a listen:

www.theliftcommunity.com/4-8-10.mp3

Now if I could just convince a few people that rain on your wedding day isn't actually an example of irony, I could consider it an evening well-spent.

5 comments:

ylmurph said...

which guy in the cartoon were you?
That was literally a commentary on a commentary...
see what I did there?

carlsweatman said...

I have the same feelings about the use of 'literally' that you do. However, I have stronger feelings about people using 'actually' in completely the wrong way--and too often in the wrong way. When are people going to learn?

david.r.haase@gmail.com said...

I get that rain on your wedding day isn't ironic...but what about a free ride, when you've already paid?

Or the good advice that I just didn't take?

Dan said...

"cool!"

Devin Rose said...

In Alanis' defense, she did later admit that she realized after the fact that most of her song's references weren't ironic--they were just really bad things that could happen to people.